Centre for Flexible Learning (CFL)

Creative Commons Licence

7 licence types (in order from the least to the most restrictive):

a)     CC zero
b)     CC BY (Attribution)
c)    CC BY-SA (Attribution-Share-Alike)
d)    CC BY-ND (Attribution-No-Derivatives)
e)    CC BY-NC (Attribution-Non-Commercial)
f)    CC BY-NC-SA (Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike)
g)    CC BY-NC-ND (Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike-No Derivatives)



The following descriptions of licences is from the Creative Commons page (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/).
a)     CC BY - This licence lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon an authorís work, even commercially, as long as they credit the author for an original creation.

b)     CC BY-SA - This licence lets others remix, tweak, and build upon an authorís work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit the author and licence their new creations under the identical terms.

c)     CC BY-ND Ė This licence lets others reuse the work for any purpose, including commercially; however, it cannot be shared with others in adapted form, and credit must be provided to the author.

d)     CC BY-NC - This licence lets others remix, tweak, and build upon an authorís work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge the author and be non-commercial, they donít have to licence their derivative works on the same terms.

e)     CC BY-NC-SA - This licence lets others remix, tweak, and build upon an authorís work non-commercially, as long as they credit the author and licence their new creations under the identical terms.

f)     CC BY-NC-ND - This licence only allows others to download an authorís works and share them with others as long as they credit the author, but they canít change them in any way or use them commercially.

More detail about each of these types and the extent of conditions is to be found at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/

The University recommends use of CC BY-SA as a form of licence, given the growing openness of education. Course writers have freedom to determine which licensing regime suits the type of material produced. The copyright officer may assist authors decide which regime suits. A suitable reference to the regime should be shown on the copyright page of journals or at the beginning of articles or at the end with acknowledgements of an artistic work. An example is shown below:
ď©2019 The University of the South Pacific except where otherwise noted. This publication is licenced under terms of Creative Commons Attribution Ė CC BY SA Attribution, Share Alike 4.0. International Licence:
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0Ē.


Copyleft

 

This licence relates to computer software, art, scientific discoveries and instruments in medicine. It offers a right to freely distribute copies and modified versions of a work but with the limitation that the same rights should be preserved in derivative works created later. Any adaptations are also bound by the same licensing agreement.  
Wikipedia describes copyleft software licences as protective or reciprocal, contrasted with permissive free-software licences.
GNU General Public Licence (GPL) was the first software copyleft licence. The information necessary for reproducing and modifying the work, the licence terms are to be found in the source code.